Anaerobic Heart Rate Training To Improve Your Performance

1 Flares Filament.io Made with Flare More Info'> 1 Flares ×

A good exercise regime should consist of not only aerobic exercises, but also anaerobic heart rate training. This is especially the case if you are aiming for a faster marathon or in general: to break your personal running records.

Anaerobic heart rate training involves high intensity running or the use of weights, but contrary to what some may believe, one can use either heavy or light weights.

So, why is it important to do both aerobic and anaerobic training?

Anaerobic heart rate

Aerobic And Anaerobic Exercise

First let’s look at the purpose of aerobic exercise. This form of training is designed to benefit the heart and lungs, and if performed on a regular basis, it allows the heart and lungs to work more efficiently, and it will also aid in weight loss.

Anaerobic heart rate training has many additional benefits to the rest of the body, hence the reason why it’s crucial to include both forms in your exercise regimen.

Before You Start With Anaerobic Exercise

As with all types of physical training, it’s always wise to discuss matter with a doctor before you begin with an anaerobic heart rate training program, particularly if you’re currently out of shape.

Once your doctor has given you the green light, you should then consider discussing your needs with an experienced fitness or running trainer.

He or she will be able to recommend which exercises are best suited to your needs, and of course they will be able to offer you advice regarding what sort of heart rate you should aim for during your training sessions.

Anaerobic Heart Rate Training Zone

One of the most noticeable differences between the two types of training, apart from what’s already been mentioned, is that while it’s possible to do aerobic exercise for several hours on end, anaerobic training sessions usually have a time limit.

The reason for this is because anaerobic heart rate training generally requires you to train in the 80% to 90% heart rate zone, and when a person trains in this zone, lactic acid accumulates within the muscles quite rapidly, and after a certain period of time, the body is no long capable of removing the lactic acid quick enough. At this point, the training session ends.

It is also possible to train in the 90% to 100% heart rate zone, but this can only be done for very short periods of time, and should essentially only be done by those who are already extremely fit.

Anaerobic Threshold Training

What is the anaerobic threshold and how to find it?

At the point where lactate is produced faster than it can be removed we speak of the anaerobic threshold or AT. The best way to determine this threshold is in a laboratory setting. A graded exercise test can aid in setting your anaerobic threshold heart rate. Besides that you can often determine your maximum heart rate and VO2 max with these tests.

You have to find out what works best for you, but I like to propose two training sessions to boost your performance.

Interval at 95 – 100% of anaerobic threshold heart rate

  • Interval sessions of 60 to 90 seconds
  • Resting time between intervals is equal to 0,5 x exercise time
  • It depends on your fitness level, but aim for 5 to 10 of these intervals in your training session
  • Incorporate them in your training program once or twice a week

The second schedule, at a higher intensity, that I recommend is:

Interval at 105 – 110% of anaerobic threshold heart rate

  • Interval sessions of 2 to 3 minutes
  • Resting time between intervals is equal to 2 x exercise time
  • It depends on your fitness level, but aim for 3 to 6 of these intervals in your training session
  • Incorporate them in your training program once or twice a week

There is simply no denying the fact that if you include both aerobic training and anaerobic heart rate training in your fitness program, you’ll be setting yourself up for enjoying many years of great health.

Heart Rate Monitor Books

Are you really into heart rate monitor training and want to get in-depth advice on training with such a device? I would suggest to read Heart Rate Training written by Roy Benson and Heart Monitor Training for the Compleat Idiot written by John Parker. The last book is oriented at runners and the first one is useful for anyone serious about sports.


Return from Anaerobic Heart Rate Training to Heart Rate Monitor

Return to Marathon Training Tips home

1 Flares Twitter 1 Facebook 0 Google+ 0 Filament.io Made with Flare More Info'> 1 Flares ×
1 Flares Twitter 1 Facebook 0 Google+ 0 Filament.io 1 Flares ×